Natural Plant Dyed Silk – Walnut Husks – Beige Gold

The brown husks contain the dye pigment. These were found on the ground where they had had been decaying under a walnut tree on Bossington Green (Nr Porlock, North Somerset.)

Dye Bath Preparation

  • Soak walnut husks with walnuts in, including broken husk pieces, in water for two days.
  • Boil for 30 mins and leave soaking for another two days.
  • Boil again and leave to cool a little.
  • Remove husks and decant liquid to bowl.
  • Add wet silk pieces
  • Agitate frequently then soak overnight

Dye bath is quite dark after walnut husks soaked in water.

Longer soaking might even produce darker dye bath. There is a lot of pigment left in the dye bath and dye can be stored in jars. Fill to brim to avoid mould forming. it could also be used to add to creams and golds to strengthen.

Silk takes up the brown dye bath quickly but keep turning and agitating occasionally while soaking. (I don’t boil Ahimsa silk as it would roughen surface) Soaking is adequate for obtaining a reasonable colour.

Silk dyed rinsed wet hanging to dry – always dries much lighter.
Walnut Light – Walnut Dark – Comfrey Light – Comfrey Dark

Silk samples show differences of colour between Walnut dye and Comfrey dye. Walnut dye result is the darkest gold, more of an envelope buff tone, achieved with natural plant dyes.

Logwood bark – Walnut dark – Walnut light – Comfrey leaves – Hawthorne berries – St. Johns Wort flowers

The dyed samples will be painted on with silk dyes, to become garments or quilts. Walnut died pieces will be shown here again when painted.

See more and others’ dye procedures on my Natural Plant Dye Pinterest Board.