Butterflies and Black Lace Patchwork Dress, ‘Love Never Dies’ on Stretch T-shirt Bandeau

‘Love Never Dies’ inspiration taken from autumn floral printed T-shirt patch, used in dress centre front.

Bandeau top inspiration: cut from ethnic printed skinny stretch dress.

Dress is not yet in online shop…

Dress USE - FRONT daylight - edited.png

Patches made and joined in strips of three, then join those to make a length as shown in picture on floor.

Patchwork section attached to stretchy cotton bandeau top, by hand stretch back stitch shown in MAKING INSTRUCTIONS below.

Seams are overlapped one quarter inch – one half inch, and zig-zag machined to avoid bulky inside seams.  6 different patchwork fabrics are used making up a large rectangle of 11 patches x 3 patches.  Keep adding strips (here strips are 3 patches long).  Make strips until there are enough to join up around hips: add 2 extra patch widths to create fullness when attached to bandeau top.

NOTE:  black lace patches are made by fixing over lighter fabric base.  There are possibilities of using different backgrounds for lace, for more subtle effects.

Bandeau patchworks, machined.png

When choosing fabrics, 6 seems to be a good number of alternative fabrics.  They can be either contrasting, as here, or similar in tone.  Dark – Medium- Light is a good mix.

Muted schemes are more satisfactory and versatile than multi-rainbow colour themes.  The size of fabric areas cut from garments, dictates the size of the patches.  In this instance it was the ‘Love Never Dies’ T-shirt print I started from, giving me two patch lengths when cutting.

Bandeau patwork arrangements.png

I was originally going to position the patchworks in diagonal formation over a bias cut lining, but they weren’t cut square so it would look odd.  I therefore turned it to straightforward vertical arrangement.  Recycling 6 different garments, and cutting at least 8 patches from each, is a good start.  I cut more if I like a scheme and want to make another similar.

These patches are 12.5cm x 18cm cut (approximately 7″ x 5″).  Decide the length of garment skirt section needed, from seam under bandeau top, then divide by three for length of patchwork strips: to be either 3, 4, or 5 patches deep. 3 is enough for this short dress.

Dress USE - BACK CLOSEUP - edited.png

Close up of back, shows butterfly prints, and zig-zag seaming flat overlaps.

MAKING INSTRUCTIONS

Bandeau patchworks mcahined zigzag.png

Zig-zag machining of patches: overlap quarter inch,
making two rows at each overlap (note it is flat,
no folded seams).

Bandeau, pinning bandeau lower front to pathworks.png

Pinning patchwork length equally along bandeau bottom

on the inside.

bandeau-patchworks-pinned-evenly-to-bandeau

The patchwork top folded over and pinned in place, 

ready for stitching by hand.

Bandeau, front pinned, back not.png

How the pinning looks after pinning one section to sew.
More to follow.....

Hand sewing Patches to bandeau A stretch stitch completed two rows.png

Hand stitched back stitch which gives full stretch result.
Photo of stitch process omitted but IS SHOWN BELOW when
attaching lining to this seam join. (Note: I could have
machine-tacked lining to patches first, then stretch
stitched them both together, but I needed to experiment)

Hand sewing Patches to bandeau B stretch stitch outside.png

Outer view shows small hand stitches (stretch back stitch)
showing through.  Quite acceptable appearance;
could even be larger, as a feature.

hand-sewing-lining-c-stretch-stitch-lining-to-dress

Stretch back stitch: holding work this way, each needle
insertion is towards you, hand underneath can test for
flexibility of stretch, to ensure same stretch as patches
fabric.

hand-sewing-lining-a-stretch-stitch-from-left-to-right

Working left to right, back-stitching into patchwork
section above, and lining section below.  This lining
(taken from a dress), is on the 'bias' which aids
stretchiness. It would need to be same width as 
patchwork section sewn to, to give equal stretch.

Hand sewing Lining B stretch stitch lining to dress.png

Needle comes back to lining back stitch from upper
stitch. Needle goes in right to left, but stitches
complete to the right.

bandeau-hand-sewn-stretch-stitch-inside-bandeauside

Finished stretch stitch: inside of dress, just below
where dress patchwork attaches (also stretch stitch)
to bandeau.

lace-trim-turn-over-pinning-easing-in-fullness

Join strips of lace for hem trim.  I used a neck
frill and sleeve edges from a lace dress (4 cut
lengths). Press quarter inch in then pin to dress hem.

lace-trim-zig-zag-machining-turned-in-pinned-to-hem

Machining lace edgings to dress hem.  Zig-zag.

 

bandeau-inside-dress-after-zigzag-machining-over-topside-frill-edges-folded-in

Finished lace trim attached (inside view).
NOTE: dress fabric was turned under and pressed
towards front beforehand.

bandeau-lace-trim-machined-to-edge-of-patchwork

Finished lace trim showing front and inside back.

love-never-dies-5-fabric-border-added-to-lining

Fabric hem sewn to inside lining:
to sit behind black lace.

love-never-dies-6-bandeau-top-elastic-inserted

Top of bandeau is folded over and narrow elastic
inserted.  Stretchiness is preserved by using
stretch backstitch instead of machining.

A lot of scrolling for instructions!!

Future work will explore Slideshare and Flipboard embeds.

Design Philosophy

Shamanic Nights  makes a personal commitment to recycling textiles and fast fashion.  ‘Up-cycled couture’ better describes my craft business, as each garment is very carefully hand made from cut up recycled clothes found in Devon Charity Shops.  Some have hand painted silk designs by  Amelia Jane Designs   These unique colourful one-off garments are available to buy online.  Online Shop

Source: Design Philosophy

Plum Velvet skirts with wool cummerbund

Inspiration started with the velvet.  Then envisaged with the wool cummerbund due to the lilac/beige colour harmony.  Floral voile insets also chosen for colour harmony.  An experimentation challenge with ‘V’ shaped cummerbund (lined) and cutting skirt sections to hang from the diagonal.

Skirt No. 1 has 4 inserts (great for dancing); skirt No. 2 has just 2, front and back.  Skirt No. 1 has butterfly print hem frill, skirt No. 2 has cream lining frill.

plum-velvet-1-front-view-edited
Plum velvet skirt front
plum-velvet-1-side-floral-inset-panel-from-back-view-edited
Plum velvet skirt side inset
plum-velvet-1-front-floral-inset-edited
Plum velvet skirt back inset

Plum velvet skirt 2 side zip lace - edited .JPGPlum velvet skirt No. 2 side insertion of invisible zip.

 

Making procedure:

The velvet was cut to allow for 8 pieces, 4 in each skirt,
(2 back, 2 front).  Velvet piece positioned to cummerbund
on dummy, gathered, using straight edge, allow to hang,
then cut straight hem at base.  Remove and cut 3 more for
first skirt.
Once they were all cut, I placed the second group of
4 velvet pieces the other way up, i.e. placing the bias
along the cummerbund edge, allowing the straight edge to
become the hem. (It was necessary to use straight edge to
begin with to allow natural fall before cutting
fabric at hem).
n-pinning-velvet-to-cummerbund-roughly
Below are two pieces after cutting shapes (from hanging
on dummy), laid out with triangle gap, to cut inserts out.
cutting-triangle-fabric-for-inset-larger-than-spacejpg
Cutting triangle insert for velvet front backs.
pin-lace-to-triange-inset-after-stretch-zigzagging-the-showing-edge-jpg
Triangle inset: lace detail (strip cut from blouse)
is stretched with zig-zag stitching to make flared
edge then machined to inset side. Then join inset to
main skirt part:either zig-zag on top of right side,
or make seam with right sides together
then press flat well.

machine-inset-right-sides-together-on-to-velvetMachining right sides together,
joining inset to velvet

c-cummerbund-front-and-back-make-darts

Cummerbund front and back - cut and darted.
Measure your waist or dropped waist above hip,
at position required: (e.g. 26") then allow
1.5 inches extra for waist darts on each piece,
(which allows for dart take-up).  Machine, press.
e-machine-lining-to-wool-cummerbund-leave-sides-open-for-seaming
Lining also cut on bias and darted.
Iron-on interfacing won't need darts
if just 2 inches deep.
Lay on and cut curved shapes.
Machine half inch at waist. Clip waist.
g-press-lining-and-wool-at-seam-linePress lining inwards leaving seam space for
closed side and zipped side.  Finnish waist
machine line into fold/seam edge point of
lining fold.
F. Snip waiste seams for ease, before turning to press.JPG

Snip inside waist top seams including
stiffening.
k-stitch-side-seams-both-sidesMachine both side seams along wool seam and
lining seam all in one go. Press seam flat,
(snip waist seams as above), then fold lining
inwards and steam-press flat.
m-one-side-joined-pressed-one-open-for-zip
Cummerbund lining pressed inside. One side
left open for zip when skirt
section is attached.

front-sections-cut-to-allow-gathers-inset-joined-to-velvetVelvet and insets skirt section all joined:
ready to pin and tack to cummerbund,
tacking before machining.

front-and-back-insets-seamed-in-between-velvetAll skirt sections joined.  Top of lace
strips are folded in and excess cut off,
then machined down while 
top-stitching with zig-zag, around inserts
to avoid bulky seams.

p-pinned-to-cummerbund-equalizing-fullness-between-pins-before-joiningHand gather between pins, after positioning
velvet to cummerbund, right sides together.
Machine along gather line,
removing pins as you go.

machining-hem-zig-zag-prior-to-adding-frill-behindZig-zagging hem, pulling slightly,
to create slight flare.

cream-frill-top-edge-pressed-then-pinned-to-underside-of-skirt-velvetAttaching frill behind skirt
(underside view): Join strips of satin,
silk, or polyester lining fabric
(best cut on bias) twice length needed.
Press over top edge quarter inch, pin to
inside of skirt, half inch above hem.
Zig-zag machine frill to skirt,
removing pins as you go.
Zig-zag frill hem from front.

 

 

Jacket ‘LILIES’

This patchwork jacket was commissioned by 99yr old Beth, a friend of my sister’s in Dorset. She likes something different. Having lived in China, the average high street shop doesn’t attract her.

Clothes I make are well received by women who want something unique and original, rather than from high street chain stores; also for women who appreciate the craft of creative patchwork, resulting in the creation of a new fabric.

Original fabrics
The original fabrics chosen for Lilies Jacket

I chose the fabrics myself for the jacket, having met Beth just once. The item was to be for a wedding, so I wanted it to be light and classic, but to still have some interesting elements. The first fabric I found was the beige skirt with eau de nil applique feature of lilies. I decided this was perfect for the jacket theme.

applique corner
Lilies applique patchwork front corner

Fabrics I used were linen and linen-mix skirts from charity shops. Quite a lot of fabric is needed for patchworks; its best to have at least 5 different ones.

When I cut the patches out and laid out together, I decided there needed to be a highlight colour to accent over and above the all-beige overall look.  I rushed to the shops, and was lucky to see the pale green and pale blue devore skirt with floral print in shiny synthetic satin in the first charity shop I looked in; it seemed a tad shockingly bling, but knew once it was in isolated patches, it would merely enhance the overall arrangement. As soon as I added in the new patches, I knew I would work.

Devore printed skirt with shiny blue flowers on pale green voile base
Devore printed skirt with shiny blue flowers on pale green voile base

For this jacket, I chose skirts with embroidery so I could use the embroidered areas for patches.

Cream linen skirt with brown embroidery.
Cream linen skirt with brown embroidery.

From two embroidered skirts there was enough embroidered area, to give some decoration on every patch in the jacket. I had seen Beth had some embroidered clothes and so guessed she would like it.

lining
Lining in taupe and eau de nil roses

The lining was a bonus find, another skirt, viscose type, having just the right colours of taupe background with eau de nil green in the woven roses, which ideally complimented the classic beige, cream and light green of all the patches.

Cost of fabrics was £42 plus £5 for a synthetic jacket which I just had to get, as it had the shell buttons in shiny light beige with a hint of green, perfectly matching the jacket colours. A touch of shine for a jacket to be worn at a wedding I thought.

Back view of Lilies Jacket
Back view of Lilies Jacket

Due to the centre pattern piece of paper pattern being placed on the bias of the cloth grain/weave, the square patches become diamonds.

buttonholes
Bound buttonholes with two different fabrics and the shell buttons.

Welcome to the Shamanic Nights BLOG.

My Mission:  To make beautiful casual and luxurious clothes and quilts from recycled fabrics.

Stop Landfills.   Stop Water Pollution.   Stop ‘Made in China’.   Working Ethos.

Fast fashion has encouraged the spendthrift and waste of textile materials.  So many cast-offs! I’ve noticed year on year, the plethora of higher quality fabrics donated to the ubiquitous high street charity shops.  Clothes from quality brand names or clothes hardly worn at all, make it essential that the best quality dresses, skirts and T-Shirts be given an extended life.

Linens are wonderful to work with: one pair of trousers provides large pieces, as does a flared skirt. Dresses and blouses provide prints and lace.  I choose good quality cotton, viscose and silk mostly, for summer dresses: with just a little polyester if a print inspires me, and for most linings.

Penny's Pinafore in blue linen, black embroidery anglais, and vintage print of French cafe life.
Penny’s Pinafore in blue linen, black embroidery Anglais, and vintage print of French cafe life.  (Sold)

SUSTAINABLE CLOTHING is becoming more mainstream, with increasing numbers of inspired fashion designers making clothes from UP-CYCLED and VINTAGE fabrics and sharing their ideas on Pinterest.  See many creative upcyclers, along with some of mine, here: –

Recycled fashion on Pinterest

There has been a ground swell of interest in organic cotton; grown without pesticide use, leaving no watercourse contamination.  Fertilizers are expensive for farmers in poorer countries, making crops less profitable.  The Aral Sea has dried up due to the over use of its water for Uzbekistan cotton growing.

Whilst organic cotton is all the rage, cotton itself requires so much water to grow and process, that in the long run it’s not sustainable. It takes 8,500 litres to make enough cotton for a pair of jeans. This is clearly unsustainable,  even immoral, when many areas of the world suffer drought.

Hemp is the next ‘cotton’.

http://buff.ly/2ihsXJP  ‘A brief note on Natural Fibres and Climate Change’

with many links.

FABRICS from high street store fashions have an incredibly long shelf life, but are sometimes discarded after one season’s wear or if the garment no longer fits. Even household fabrics are renewed more often than years ago. These fabrics and clothes are still here. Piling up in landfills. Rather than throwing away, we need to recycle all textiles as much as possible.

patchwork-semi-circle-joined-front-unjoined

Patchwork joining for Cherry Fluzzie B, January 2017

Finished dress: Cherry Fluzzie B

For this reason I believe more businesses will take on this challenge; to produce textile products that customers will want just as much as they want to buy new textiles.

http://fashionrevolution.org/  #WhoMadeMyclothes

One of the best things everyone can do is to stop buying more new stuff.

Take a fresh look at what we already have.  Look in your wardrobe; if you don’t wear something, but love the fabric, cut it up and make something new; add another recycled fabric to it.

I take commissions using your fabrics or I will research for a specific colourway or themed garments from the charity shops.

‘The True cost of Cotton’  shows children working in the cotton fields.

Links to ethical fashion concerns will be added progressively…..