Design Philosophy

Shamanic Nights  makes a personal commitment to recycling textiles and fast fashion.  ‘Up-cycled couture’ better describes my craft business, as each garment is very carefully hand made from cut up recycled clothes found in Devon Charity Shops.  Some have hand painted silk designs by  Amelia Jane Designs   These unique colourful one-off garments are available to buy online.  Online Shop

Source: Design Philosophy

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Welcome to the Shamanic Nights BLOG.

My Mission:  To make beautiful casual and luxurious clothes and quilts from recycled fabrics.

Stop Landfills.   Stop Water Pollution.   Stop ‘Made in China’.   Working Ethos.

Fast fashion has encouraged the spendthrift and waste of textile materials.  So many cast-offs! I’ve noticed year on year, the plethora of higher quality fabrics donated to the ubiquitous high street charity shops.  Clothes from quality brand names or clothes hardly worn at all, make it essential that the best quality dresses, skirts and T-Shirts be given an extended life.

Linens are wonderful to work with: one pair of trousers provides large pieces, as does a flared skirt. Dresses and blouses provide prints and lace.  I choose good quality cotton, viscose and silk mostly, for summer dresses: with just a little polyester if a print inspires me, and for most linings.

Penny's Pinafore in blue linen, black embroidery anglais, and vintage print of French cafe life.
Penny’s Pinafore in blue linen, black embroidery Anglais, and vintage print of French cafe life.  (Sold)

SUSTAINABLE CLOTHING is becoming more mainstream, with increasing numbers of inspired fashion designers making clothes from UP-CYCLED and VINTAGE fabrics and sharing their ideas on Pinterest.  See many creative upcyclers, along with some of mine, here: –

Recycled fashion on Pinterest

There has been a ground swell of interest in organic cotton; grown without pesticide use, leaving no watercourse contamination.  Fertilizers are expensive for farmers in poorer countries, making crops less profitable.  The Aral Sea has dried up due to the over use of its water for Uzbekistan cotton growing.

Whilst organic cotton is all the rage, cotton itself requires so much water to grow and process, that in the long run it’s not sustainable. It takes 8,500 litres to make enough cotton for a pair of jeans. This is clearly unsustainable,  even immoral, when many areas of the world suffer drought.

Hemp is the next ‘cotton’.

http://buff.ly/2ihsXJP  ‘A brief note on Natural Fibres and Climate Change’

with many links.

FABRICS from high street store fashions have an incredibly long shelf life, but are sometimes discarded after one season’s wear or if the garment no longer fits. Even household fabrics are renewed more often than years ago. These fabrics and clothes are still here. Piling up in landfills. Rather than throwing away, we need to recycle all textiles as much as possible.

patchwork-semi-circle-joined-front-unjoined

Patchwork joining for Cherry Fluzzie B, January 2017

Finished dress: Cherry Fluzzie B

For this reason I believe more businesses will take on this challenge; to produce textile products that customers will want just as much as they want to buy new textiles.

http://fashionrevolution.org/  #WhoMadeMyclothes

One of the best things everyone can do is to stop buying more new stuff.

Take a fresh look at what we already have.  Look in your wardrobe; if you don’t wear something, but love the fabric, cut it up and make something new; add another recycled fabric to it.

I take commissions using your fabrics or I will research for a specific colourway or themed garments from the charity shops.

‘The True cost of Cotton’  shows children working in the cotton fields.

Links to ethical fashion concerns will be added progressively…..